Tag Archives: Martin Edwards

Agatha Christie Writes Alone (Queens of Crime At War 1)

Agatha Christie had a very productive WW2.

This is the start of Queens of Crime at War, a six part series looking at what the best writers from the golden age of detective fiction did once that period came to an end with the start of the Second World War.

This episode also marks the start of the Shedunnit Pledge Drive! I’m aiming to add 100 new members to the Shedunnit Book Club by the end of 2021, with the aim of producing more mini series like this one. If you’d like to be part of that and feel able to offer some support, please visit shedunnitshow.com/pledgedrive.

Thanks to my guests:
— J.C. Bernthal is an Agatha Christie scholar and the author of Queering Agatha Christie. His website is jcbernthal.com and he is on Twitter as @jcbernthal
— Martin Edwards is a crime writer and the author of, among many other books, The Golden Age of Murder. Find out more about all his work at martinedwardsbooks.com or via his Twitter as @medwardsbooks

There are no spoilers in this episode.

Books referenced:
The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards
— Agatha Christie Goes To War edited by Rebecca Mills and J.C. Bernthal
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Murder Must Appetise by Harry Keating
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
The ABC Murders  by Agatha Christie
Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie
One, Two Buckle, My Shoe by Agatha Christie
— An Autobiography by Agatha Christie
Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie
Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie
N or M?  by Agatha Christie
The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie
The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie
Partners in Crime by Agatha Christie
Bletchley Park: The Codebreakers of Station X by Michael Smith
The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie
Curtain by Agatha Christie
Sleeping Murder by Agatha Christie
The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie
Taken at the Flood by Agatha Christie
A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie
The Hollow  by Agatha Christie
Five Little Pigs by Agatha Christie

Thanks to today’s sponsors:
— Girlfriend Collective. Get $25 off your $100+ purchase of sustainable, ethically made activewear at girlfriend.com/shedunnit.
— Milk Bar. Get $10 off any order of $50 or more when you go to milkbarstore.com/shedunnit.

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Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/agathachristiewritesalonetranscript.

The podcast is on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

The original music for this series, “The Case Of The Black Stormcloud”, was created by Martin Zaltz Austwick. Find out more about his work at martinzaltzaustwick.wordpress.com.

Links to Blackwell’s are affiliate links, meaning that the podcast receives a small commission when you purchase a book there (the price remains the same for you). Blackwell’s is a UK independent bookselling chain that ships internationally at no extra charge.

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