6. Adaptations (with Sarah Phelps)

For many people, their main contact with detective fiction is via film and television adaptations. For a huge global audience, Agatha Christie’s work is as often watched as it is read. Any new production is greeted with intense scrutiny, so what is it really like to adapt these stories? Screenwriter Sarah Phelps, the woman behind the recent BBC versions of And Then There Were None, Witness for the Prosecution, Ordeal by Innocence and now The ABC Murders, explains.

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/adaptations. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

Contributors:
—Sarah Phelps, who is on Twitter as @PhelpsieSarah.

Books and stories mentioned in order of appearance:
The 1928 film “The Passing of Mr Quin” is based on the short story “The Coming of Mr. Quin”, which part of the Agatha Christie collection The Mysterious Mr. Quin
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
“Witness for the Prosecution” by Agatha Christie
Ordeal by Innocence by Agatha Christie
The ABC Murders by Agatha Christie
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
Mrs McGinty’s Dead by Agatha Christie
Agatha Christie on Screen by Mark Aldridge

Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/adaptationstranscript

5. Crime at Christmas

Reading crime fiction from the early twentieth century is a really popular activity at Christmas. It’s nice to curl up with a good whodunnit by the fire, but if we stop and think about it, reading about complicated ways for people to die is not exactly the most festive thing to do. So why is it that we love crime at Christmas?

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/crimeatchristmas. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

Contributors:
Cecily Gayford, senior commissioning editor at Profile
Anna Leszkiewicz, deputy culture editor at the New Statesman. Read her article about cosy murder mysteries here.

Books and stories mentioned in order of appearance:
The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L. Sayers
Hercule Poirot’s Christmas by Agatha Christie
Murder in the Snow: a Cotswold Christmas Mystery by Gladys Mitchell
The Santa Klaus Murder by Mavis Doriel Hay
Portrait of a Murderer: A Christmas Crime Story by Anne Meredith
A Very Murderous Christmas edited by Cecily Gayford
The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and a Selection of Entrées by Agatha Christie
Hangman’s Holiday by Dorothy L. Sayers (includes ‘The Necklace of Pearls’)

Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/crimeatchristmastranscript

4. The Lady Vanishes

On 3 December 1926, Agatha Christie left her home in the southern English county of Berkshire just after 9.30 in the evening. She drove away, taking a small suitcase and a fur coat with her. The following morning, the car was found 15 miles away on the edge of a lake called Silent Pool. The headlights were still on and her luggage was inside, but the driver was nowhere to be seen. The lady had vanished.

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/theladyvanishes. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

Books mentioned in order of appearance
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
An Autobiography by Agatha Christie
The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christie
Unnatural Death by Dorothy L Sayers
Agatha Christie: A Biography by Janet Morgan
Agatha by Kathleen Tynan
Agatha Christie and the Missing Eleven Days by Jared Code
Agatha Christie: The Finished Portrait by Andrew Norman
A Talent for Murder by Andrew Wilson
The Big Four by Agatha Christie
The Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie
The Seven Dials Mystery by Agatha Christie
The Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie
Giant’s Bread by Mary Westmacott

Sources:
The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards
The Complete Christie: An Agatha Christie Encyclopaedia by Matthew Bunson
The British Newspaper Archive

Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/theladyvanishestranscript.

3. Queer Clues

The detective stories of the 1920s and 30s aren’t exactly well known for being edgy, or at the vanguard of the struggle for gay rights. But there are queer clues everywhere in these books, if you only know where to look for them.

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/queerclues. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

Contributors:
JC Bernthal, academic and author of Queering Agatha Christie
—Moira Redmond, journalist and blogger at clothesinbooks.blogspot.com

Books referenced in order of appearance
Queering Agatha Christie by JC Bernthal
The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie
A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie
Unnatural Death by Dorothy L Sayers
Murder in the Closet edited by Curtis Evans and with essays by multiple authors, including Moira Redmond
Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey
Murder is Easy by Agatha Christie
Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie

Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/queercluestranscript.

2. Crippen

The detective writers of the 1920s and 1930s weren’t working a vacuum. They took a keen interest in the crimes of their time, often weaving elements from actual murder cases into their plots or referencing them directly. And there was one case, a murder both infamous and domestic, that interested the likes of Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and Anthony Berkeley more than any other.

This real life murder mystery has everything: a body hidden in the cellar, adultery, a transatlantic steamship pursuit, cross dressing, and a pleasingly ambiguous ending. It was referenced in novels more than any other by the detective writers of the golden age, and did a great deal to shape the genre as we know it today.

This is the story of Dr Crippen.

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/crippen. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that in your app of choice.

Books referenced in order of appearance:
Walter Dew: The Man Who Caught Crippen by Nicholas Connell
Three Act Tragedy by Agatha Christie
The Wychford Poisoning Case by Anthony Berkeley
Mrs McGinty’s Dead by Agatha Christie
Malice Aforethought by Frances Iles (aka Anthony Berkeley)
The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards
“The Lernean Hydra” in The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie
The Case with Nine Solutions by J. J. Connington
The House That Berry Built by Dornford Yates
Henbane by Catherine Meadows
Dancing for the Hangman by Martin Edwards

You can find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/crippentranscript.

1. Surplus Women

After the First World War, there was a great flowering of female independence as more women chose to live single lives. This change, and the backlash to it, is all there to be found in the murder mysteries of the period, if you just dig a little below the surface. From self-contained, professional women like Mary Whittaker in Dorothy L Sayers’ Unnatural Death to dear, fluffy Miss Marple, there are a multitude of single women’s lives to discover.
But let’s go back to the beginning. This particular story starts with the surplus women.

Find more information about this episode and links to the books discussed at shedunnitshow.com/surpluswomen. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the next episode. Click here to do that in your app of choice.

Contributors:
Rosemary Cresswell, senior lecturer in global history at the University of Hull. Follow her on Twitter @RosieCresswell.
Camilla Nelson, associate professor of writing at the University of Notre Dame Australia.
—Helen Parkinson

Further reading:
A field guide to spinsters in English fiction
‘Surplus women’: a legacy of World War One?
Singled Out: How Two Million Women Survived Without Men After the First World War by Virginia Nicholson.
The Shadow of Marriage by Katherine Holden
Unnatural Death by Dorothy L Sayers

You can find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/surpluswomentranscript.

0. Whodunnit?

For a couple of decades between the first and second world wars, something mysterious happened. A golden age of detective fiction dawned, and people around the world are still devouring books from this time by Agatha Christie, Dorothy L Sayers, Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley, Gladys Mitchell, Ngaio Marsh, Josephine Tey and more. In this new podcast, Caroline Crampton will be unravelling the mysteries behind such classic detective stories, looking at the social, literary and political context in which these writers worked. If you’ve ever stayed up late reading under the covers to find out whodunnit, then this podcast is for you.

Find the show at shedunnitshow.com, on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and in all major podcast apps. Make sure you’re subscribed so you don’t miss the first episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice.

You can find a full transcript of this mini episode at shedunnitshow.com/whodunnittranscript.